Memorial of Saint Timothy and Saint Titus, bishops

Timothy (Greek: Τιμόθεος; Timótheos, meaning “honouring God”[1]) was a first-century Jewish Christian bishop who died around the year 80. The New Testament indicates that Timothy traveled with Saint Paul, who was also his mentor. He is addressed as the recipient of the Epistles to Timothy. Contents [hide] 1 Life 2 Veneration 3 References 4 External links [edit] Life Timothy is mentioned in the Bible at the time of Paul’s second visit to Lystra in Anatolia, where Timothy is mentioned as a “disciple”.[2] Paul, impressed by his “own son in the faith,” arranged that he should become his companion. Unlike Paul, Timothy had not however been circumcised, and Paul now ensured that this was done, according to the text, to ensure Timothy’s acceptability to the Jews. According to McGarvey[3] Paul performed the operation “with his own hand”, but others claim this is unlikely and nowhere attested[citation needed]. He was ordained[4] and went with Paul on his journeys through Phrygia, Galatia, Mysia, Troas, Philippi, Veria, and Corinth. His mother, Eunice, and his grandmother, Lois, are noted as eminent for their piety and faith,[5] which indicates that they were also likely Jewish Christians. Timothy is praised by Paul for his knowledge of the Scriptures (in the 1st century mostly the Septuagint, see Development of the New Testament canon#Clement of Rome), and is said to have been acquainted with the Scriptures since childhood.[6] Little is known about Timothy’s father; only that he was Greek.[7] Rembrandt’s Timothy and his grandmother, 1648.According to later tradition, Paul consecrated Timothy as bishop of Ephesus in the year 65, where he served for 15 years. In the year 80 (though some sources place the event during the year 97, with Timothy dying at age 80), Timothy tried to halt a pagan procession of idols, ceremonies, and songs. In response to his preaching of the gospel, the angry pagans beat him, dragged him through the streets, and stoned him to death. In the 4th century, his relics were transferred to the Church of the Holy Apostles in Constantinople. [edit] Veneration Timothy is venerated as an apostle, saint and martyr by the Eastern Orthodox Church, with his feast day on 22 January. The Roman Catholic calendar of saints venerates Timothy together with Titus with a memorial on 26 January. In the General Roman Calendar of 1962, his feast, a third class, is kept on 24 January. Along with Titus and Silas, he is commemorated by the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America and The Episcopal Church on 26 January. Timothy’s feast is kept by the Lutheran Church – Missouri Synod on 24 January.

Saint Titus was a companion of Saint Paul, mentioned in several of the Pauline epistles. Titus was with Paul and Barnabas at Antioch and accompanied them to the Council of Jerusalem,[1] although his name occurs nowhere in the Acts of the Apostles.

He appears to have been a Gentile – for Paul sternly refused to have him circumcised, because Paul believed Christ’s gospel freed believers from the requirements of the Mosaic Law (see Abrogation of Old Covenant laws) — and to have been chiefly engaged in ministering to Gentiles. At a later period, Paul’s epistles place him with Paul and Timothy at Ephesus, whence he was sent by Paul to Corinth for the purpose of getting the contributions of the church there on behalf of the poor Christians at Jerusalem sent forward.[2] He rejoined Paul when he was in Macedonia, and cheered him with the tidings he brought from Corinth.[3] After this his name is not mentioned until after Paul’s first imprisonment, when he was engaged in the organization of the church in Crete, where Paul had left him for this purpose.[4] The last notice of him is in 2 Timothy 4:10, where he leaves Paul in Rome in order to travel to Dalmatia. The New Testament does not record his death.

According to tradition, Paul ordained Titus bishop of Gortyn in Crete. He died in the year 107, aged about 95.

It has been argued that the name “Titus” in 2 Corinthians and Galatians is nothing more than an informal name used by Timothy, implied already by the fact that even though both are said to be long-term close companions of Paul, they never appear in common scenes.[5] The theory proposes that a number of passages—1 Cor. 4:17, 16.10; 2 Cor. 2:13, 7:6, 13-14, 12:18; and Acts 19.22—all refer to the same journey of a single individual, Titus-Timothy. Paul’s Epistle 2 Timothy seems to dispute this, by claiming that Titus has gone to Dalmatia.[6]

The feast day of Titus was not included in the Tridentine Calendar. When added in 1854, it was assigned to 6 February.[7] In 1969, the Roman Catholic Church assigned the feast to 26 January so as to celebrate the two disciples of Paul, Titus and Saint Timothy, on the day after the feast of the Conversion of St. Paul.[8] The Evangelical Lutheran Church in America celebrates these two, together with Silas, on the same date. The Eastern Orthodox Church commemorates him on 25 August and on 4 January.

His relics, now consisting of only his skull, are venerated in the Church of St. Titus, Heraklion, Crete to which it was returned in 1966[9] after being removed to Venice during the Turkish occupation.

Advertisements